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Graduate and Professional Tests

Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is an aptitude test designed to assess the potential of bachelor's degree students to succeed in academic studies at the graduate level (master's, doctorate). It is composed of three parts: a general aptitude test, subject tests in selected disciplines, and a writing assessment.

Dental Admissions Test (DAT) is a standardized test approved by the American Dental Association for use in assessing the probable success of bachelor's degree students applying for admission to first degree programs in dentistry. It consists of four parts: scientific knowledge, quantitative reasoning, verbal reasoning, and perceptual ability.

Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is a standardized test developed by the Graduate Management Admissions Council to assess the potential of bachelor's degree students to succeed in MBA studies and related graduate-level business administration programs. It consists of three parts: verbal reasoning, quantitative reasoning, and analytical writing.

Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is a standardized test developed by the Law School Admissions Council to assess the potential of bachelor's degree students to succeed in undergraduate legal studies leading to the JD degree. It assesses verbal reasoning, analytical writing, and logical skills.

Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) is a standardized test approved by the Association of American Medical Colleges for use in assessing the probable success of bachelor's degree students applying for admission to first degree programs in medicine. It consists of five parts: scientific knowledge, quantitative reasoning, verbal reasoning, critical thinking, and writing ability.

Miller Analogies Test (MAT) is a test of reasoning ability, using verbal analogies, that is used by many graduate-level higher education programs to help assess the potential of applicants, particularly in fields such as education.

Veterinary College Admissons Test (VCAT) is a standardized test developed by the Psychological Corporation for use in assessing the probable success of bachelor's degree students applying for admission to first degree programs in veterinary medicine. It consists of five parts: biology, chemistry, quantitative reasoning, verbal reasoning, and reading ability.

Achievement Examinations

Achievement examinations are traditional essay, problem-solving, and oral examinations, not just standardized tests, that are given to students who complete special preparatory studies, often in addition to regular school work. They are recognized throughout the U.S. higher education system, and in many other countries, as signifying either the equivalent of a U.S. secondary education or the attainment of an international standard of scholastic preparation.

General Educational Development (GED) Program is a combined study program and battery of five examinations (literature and the arts, social sciences, mathematics, physical sciences, and writing assessment) that leads to the GED Diploma, recognized in all U.S. states as equivalent to a High School Diploma. The examinations are designed so that a minimum passing grade meets the standard reached by 67 percent of all graduating secondary school students in the same year. Adults may study individually or through special GED centers located across the country.

Advanced Placement (AP) Examinations is a program of (currently) 33 study programs and associated written examinations in 19 subject areas, taught at the level of introductory bachelor's degree studies, offered at cooperating secondary schools by specially trained instructors and using college-level resources. Achievement of a score of 3 or higher (scoring range: 1-5) on the final examination is considered the equivalent of passing an introductory undergraduate course in the examined subject, and such students may receive advanced credit for the course before entering higher education. AP examinations are recognized by over 13,000 schools and institutions in the United States and abroad, and in many cases students who present passing scores in several AP subjects may be exempted from up to a year of undergraduate study in the United States or be granted direct access to higher education in other countries.

International Baccalaureate (IB) is a two-year secondary-level diploma program for students age 16-19, offered by specially trained instructors in cooperating secondary schools or dedicated IB schools. Students study and are examined in a curriculum of six broad areas (primary and secondary languages, arts, social sciences, physical sciences, and mathematics) and are award the IB Diploma if successful. Many U.S. secondary schools offer the IB program as an option; completion of the program generally requires U.S. students to remain in school for at least one semester beyond the 12th year. The IB is widely recognized as an international access credential for higher education.

College Level Examination Program (CLEP) is a structured array of examinations designed to enable undergraduate postsecondary students to demonstrate mastery of subject content in areas that they have studied on their own or in which they have accumulated sufficient experience to attempt to be exempted from course requirements by passing one or more CLEP examinations. Passing scores (which vary by examination) are usually accepted by U.S. institutions as the equivalent of completing specified courses in the examined subject, and academic credit hours are awarded. There are 5 general examinations (English, humanities, social sciences and history, natural sciences, and mathematics) and 29 specific course-related subject examinations. CLEP examinations are often used by U.S. and international students to exempt themselves from having to repeat material already mastered or to skip introductory-level courses or distribution requirements.